How Important Is Your English To You?

Female Forum Forums General Discussion General Chat How Important Is Your English To You?

This topic contains 15 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  KitKatKitty 1 week ago.

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  • #219342

    For me, it is very important. It’s like this:

    you’re = you ARE/your = your

    it’s = it is/its = its

    their/there

    wander/wonder

    they’re = they are/there’re = there are/that’s = that is

    which/witch

    …The list goes on. I like correct grammar and correct spellings. Hey, that’s just me!

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    #219353

    I didn’t know there was a contraction for “there are.”

    There’s also “to,” “too” and “two,” which seem to be misused a lot.  I think “to” is used in place of “too” because of accidental typos.  I’ve done it too many times to count.

    I see “its” and “it’s” misused a lot…mostly “it’s” used instead of “its.”  I guess, it’s ingrained in us to use an apostrophe to denote possession.  It’s different with “its.”

    On occasion, I still have to Google the proper use of words, like “which” vs. “that.”

    One thing that has been driving me nuts lately is the improper placement of “only.”  There’s a plethora of Liberty Mutual advertisements that proclaim “Only pay for what you need!” It’s like nails on a chalkboard to me!  This is one of them:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRREDL59u_o

    #219369

    I generally find that I know the correct form of most of these but, you may have noticed, I can sometimes be verbose and use many commas. It’s  often that I get them in the wrong place although I try hard. I find bracketing easier although it is probably frowned upon in literature. I am perhaps the opposite of you Kitty – more aligned to mathematics than English (although English can be defined mathematically lol).

    #219372

    Im not a grammer nazi, as a dyslexic I understand that it is difficult for some people to grasp the use of too /to etc and I do my best to cope with people who don’t understand the difference between pour/poor, whales / Wales, off/of  but I am a hater of text speak  the g8, m8, cu, 2morrow kind of rubbish..

     

    The thing is that language changes and evolves, its a living thing, having been out of England for 30 years I am now often told that my own use of English is outdated or old fashioned.

     

    To me that fact that someone is trying to communicate and wants to join in is more important than the grammer.. I aslo think if your own understanding is good enough them you read through mistakes, although I do have a friend who uses no punctuation at all so I have to mark her letters first and then read them or else its one huge blur!

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 5 days ago by  cassandra.
    #219376

    not that important to me

     

    as long as people can understand what I am saying, I’m good

     

    text speak is the only thing I won’t use- because I don’t understand half of it myself.

     

    I never liked english much as a subject at school either

    #219448

    Im not a grammer nazi, as a dyslexic I understand that it is difficult for some people to grasp the use of too /to etc and I do my best to cope with people who don’t understand the difference between pour/poor, whales / Wales, off/of but I am a hater of text speak the g8, m8, cu, 2morrow kind of rubbish..

    The thing is that language changes and evolves, its a living thing, having been out of England for 30 years I am now often told that my own use of English is outdated or old fashioned.

    I don’t like text speak either and seldom use a mobie let alone text. Don’t worry about your English seeming old fashioned. It is often that I am very old fashioned and deliberate in my use of old words and grammer. There are some of us about who don’t go for ‘words of the moment’ or modern abreviations which change regularly. I think one excetption is to use American spellings or terms at times but I do sometimes use English and American versions differentially to emphasise a point or in different contexts.

    I remember the manager at a place I used to work. He used the latest abreviations and buzzwords all the time, I think to show how up to date he was. Maybe everyone else knew them, maybe not, but I had great difficulty and I know communication suffered as a result. That is not good for a business. He expected everyone to follow but it was hard work. One of my pet hates is abreviations in books as it is irritating to have my fingers in several pages as placeholders so that I can constantly refer back to the glossary as I read.

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    #219484

    Have private messaged you back as promised KitKatKitty.

    1 member liked this post:
    #219564

    I will get back to you either tonight or tomorrow, Rachel!

    #219579

    Properly speaking and writing your native tongue is a reflection of your education and how you were raised. I would compromise neither by using street language or profanity. So, to answer it is very important to me.

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    #219583

    Look forward to hearing from you!

    #219627

    We are on the same page, Rhonda333. It is so, so important to express yourself clearly: both in spoken language and the written word. How else can you communicate effectively? I am not saying someone has to use upperclass language or talk like the queen BUT paying attention to grammar and speaking clearly and concisely is so, so important. If I missed my commas or wrote all in capitals or in text speak, it’d be hard to understand me. Someone’s writing needs to be concise and accurate. Full stops in the right place, the correct tenses, the correct abbrievations… it all matters. It does take practice, but is well worth it. I mean, you wouldn’t talk in text speak, so why would you write in text speak?

    #219631

    I know its slightly different but, as a home carer I learned when not to speak proper Dutch = the Queens English to my clients but to speak to them in a familiar accent with local colloquialisms that they were used to. This allowed me to make very sick people often in the last stages of their lives feel more comfortable with having a stranger around.

    Its all very well holding to your own high standards of speech but if it alienates you from those you need to connect with what use is it?

    Language is a powerful tool,  to know how to use it is important but knowing when to use it even more so.

     

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 2 days ago by  cassandra.
    #219637

    Another thing that distresses me is the abbreviated computer speak people are using in written communication. Things like how r u, and the lack of punctuation. And I see that this has crossed over into the business world. At best this says lazy, at the worst it says ignorance. I wouldn’t want to project either one.

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    #219661

    I know its slightly different but, as a home carer I learned when not to speak proper Dutch = the Queens English to my clients but to speak to them in a familiar accent with local colloquialisms that they were used to. This allowed me to make very sick people often in the last stages of their lives feel more comfortable with having a stranger around.

    While, in general, I would agree with you here Cassandra I am not sure that I would totally. The people I visited, while working, were of many varied nationalities and lifestyles so it would often have been difficult at times to follow such an aproach easily anyway but I almost always found that an open honest friendly approach worked well. That said, I was never one to follow the recommended professional standoff-ish approach. I found that with many people I could not even readily communicate with speech as we had no common language (many asian women in the big cities don’t speak English). I did find that it was more a case of approach and body language than actual language as it was obvious that actual understanding, relaxation and trust does not always depend on spoken language. It would have been even more frustrating except for the fact that one of my main jobs was working with communication aids so not understanding or communicaing with anyone was not really an option lol.

    1 member liked this post:
    #219664

    I know its slightly different but, as a home carer I learned when not to speak proper Dutch = the Queens English to my clients but to speak to them in a familiar accent with local colloquialisms that they were used to. This allowed me to make very sick people often in the last stages of their lives feel more comfortable with having a stranger around.

    While, in general, I would agree with you here Cassandra I am not sure that I would totally. The people I visited, while working, were of many varied nationalities and lifestyles so it would often have been difficult at times to follow such an aproach easily anyway but I almost always found that an open honest friendly approach worked well. That said, I was never one to follow the recommended professional standoff-ish approach. I found that with many people I could not even readily communicate with speech as we had no common language (many asian women in the big cities don’t speak English). I did find that it was more a case of approach and body language than actual language as it was obvious that actual understanding, relaxation and trust does not always depend on spoken language. It would have been even more frustrating except for the fact that one of my main jobs was working with communication aids so not understanding or communicaing with anyone was not really an option lol.

    As an immigrant myself I can relate to your approach and I bet the people you deal with appreciate it. I must say it is  the people who refused to be a little flexible in their stance who were the worst. One such was at the post office I would ask for ‘stamps to England please’.. and she would deliberatly ask questions she knew I couldnt follow.. Were they air mail?  did I need them to be registered? or were they to be insured?  etc. It was so shameful standing there stumbling over my replies hoping to God I got it right. She did nothing wrong but her clipped professional approach following every rule and regulation left me in fear of buying stamps if she was on the desk.

    Other people were so much more helpful I asked for some pipe at a building suppilers and the man asked something I didnt understand so he waved for me to follow and then showed me the two types of pipe one lined and the other not and then told me very simply by holding up each in turn what the name and the price was.. I could have hugged him.

     

    I always remember that feeling and try to be very patient with others who might not have had a decent education or be able to express themselves as freely as I can .

     

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 1 day ago by  cassandra.
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