Light a candle , show you care

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  KitKatKitty 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #203683

    Light a candle, show you care.

    Today Sept 10th is world suicide prevention day.

    I bet most people have never heard of this day.. Yet suicide is one of the biggest killers around.
    Every year world wide 1 million people commit suicide, thats 3,000 a day or one every 40 seconds. So why is it you never see anyone with a collection tin for research into the reasons for suicide or to help the families, why don’t you see people wearing a ribbon or badge to mark the day?
    More than half of all violent deaths in the world are suicide.
    In the USA alone each year 32,000 people commit suicide. Thats 10 times more than the total number of deaths in 9/11.
    In the UK each year its over 3,500, to give you a scale, last year only 2,946 died in road deaths.
    These statistics are from the AFSP and SMHAI

    I don’t intend to take anything away from those events I use them simply to show the scale involved. And world Suicide prevention day is sept 10th so it gets overshadowed.

    By now you are wondering what this has to do with you.. Because things like suicide happen to other people , not to nice ordinary people ,not to nice normal familes….

    But it does and it can and in the short time its taken you to read this post another person has decided that they would rather take their own life than face another day…..Please take a moment to remember them Light a candle at 8pm to remember those taken by suicide and the families and loved ones they left behind.

    Thankyou

    • This topic was modified 2 months ago by  cassandra.
    1 member liked this post:
    #203686

    Suicide does happen and is the main killer in the world. I think the emotions that make someone end their life must be awful, tragic and complicated. Having abusive parents or being bullied – or suffering depression – must be awful and I have so much sympathy for those thinking of ending their life as a result of such events. It does seem no one cares: because they are rejected by people for having those feelings and labelled sore losers, fools, cowards: none of those nouns I would ever use myself.

    I do believe people can be incredibly mean and only like those who are happy. Maybe that is why so many suicide cases come from supposed “happy” families, where no one saw the signs. But emotional pain is very real and people don’t help: they rub salt in the wounds. This sounds pessimistic, but – as there are so many suicides – this is true.

    I will light a candle and pray that god takes these suicide victims into heaven. Because their lives must’ve been filled with such pain and it is truly tragic. Rest in peace with god.

    2 users liked this post:
    #203690

    Please remember too that it isnt just the victims (the people who die). Its their families. Left in grief often wondering why this has happened they then become the topic of gossip or even get shunned by society.

    In our case my mum has had to face people she has known for many years cross the road to avoid her, when my second brother died between him dying and arriving at the hospital a gold ring was taken from his finger causing extra pain to her and after my youngest brother died and mum had to collect his belongings from the police station a policeman said ‘you dont want all his belongings do you’?

    Mum didnt understand and said ‘of couse , why’?

    Well he said  you dont want the rope he used to hang himself do you?

    At that point she nearly collapsed. But thats exactly the kind of callous behaviour that families have to face. I cant think of any other cause of death where anyone would dare be so mean.

    so if youre ever faced with a family member and find it awkward or hard just put yourselves in their shoes and offer sympathy just as you would to any other bereaved family.

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  cassandra.
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    #203695

    Working in healthcare gave many a time when this subject got very complicated. There have been people. I will just remember, but keep my eyes open.

    2 users liked this post:
    #203724

    This sounds terribly negative, but it seems some people don’t care about a person’s emotional wellbeing until they commit suicide. The fact someone committed suicide is awful and it is absolutely right to be upset. But surely there should be caring before someone ends their life? Some kind of intervention? It is all too easy for some to say “It’s so tragic” or “I’ll miss them” when considering that they maybe hurt the person beforehand or just had no caring. Caring should be there before the suicide: not just after.

    2 users liked this post:
    #203734

    One thing I try to do is smile and just say something to people. I know from experience that a few words can mean that people acknowledge you are there and notice them. They make a difference!

    1 member liked this post:
    #203738

    This sounds terribly negative, but it seems some people don’t care about a person’s emotional wellbeing until they commit suicide. The fact someone committed suicide is awful and it is absolutely right to be upset. But surely there should be caring before someone ends their life? Some kind of intervention? It is all too easy for some to say “It’s so tragic” or “I’ll miss them” when considering that they maybe hurt the person beforehand or just had no caring. Caring should be there before the suicide: not just after.

    Of course youre right , but in this world where everyone is under pressure and most jobs demand you be able to work under pressure we are too busy coping with our own problems to spend too much time with others.

    With many people barely managing to hold on to their own MH wellbeing they feel they cannot risk being pulled in to anyone elses problems.

    Its awful but its like being shipwrecked and knowing if you put anyone else in the life boat it will sink and you will all drown.

    For too long MH has been a dirty word, services have been cut, hospitals closed and people have been left to fend for themselves.

    Offering a word of comfort or a greeting can help and its never a bad thing. But it wont help deep rooted problems only more awareness and investment will help that.

    Again not wishing to point fingers but, my op was one I had shared via facebook. It got two likes and one share (my mother) I saw only two other posts among all my friends about suicide awareness yet on 9/11 I switched on my pc and I was flooded with posts about the WTC attacks from memorial videos,  to badges, poems, photos of the American flag at ground zero,  to people using a special picture for their profile pic it was everywhere.

    That was  a sad moment yet again it showed me that to think of someone who has died through suicide is nowhere near as acceptable as a memeorial to one who has died by a terror attack, plane crash ,bomb …. ie anything except MH issues.

    2 users liked this post:
    #203747

    I’m so sorry there was so much tragedy in your family, Cassandra.  Although I’m unfamiliar with the overall numbers for the general population, my husband just read a staggering statistic…some 9,000 US Veterans committed suicide in the last year.  The VA can hardly keep up with those veterans needing psychiatric care.  Many of our country’s homeless are mentally ill.

    Like you mentioned, the stigma attached with mental health issues prevents many from seeking the proper care to begin with.

    3 users liked this post:
    #203762

    I’m so sorry there was so much tragedy in your family, Cassandra. Although I’m unfamiliar with the overall numbers for the general population, my husband just read a staggering statistic…some 9,000 US Veterans committed suicide in the last year. The VA can hardly keep up with those veterans needing psychiatric care. Many of our country’s homeless are mentally ill.

    Like you mentioned, the stigma attached with mental health issues prevents many from seeking the proper care to begin with.

    Hi , your husband is right  in the US and the UK vets are one of the largest groups liable to suffer MH issues and then homelessness and self harm or suicide.  Absolutly disgusting that our governments expect these young men to fight ofr their counrty and then do little or nothing to help them through the trauma they suffer as a result.

    1 member liked this post:
    #203768

    I understand what you are all saying: suicide is a complicated subject and isn’t black or white.

    Those statistics are heartbreaking.

    1 member liked this post:
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