what's for dinner?

Female Forum Forums General Discussion General Chat what's for dinner?

This topic contains 90 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  SpinningJen 15 hours, 48 minutes ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 91 total)
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  • #216685

    OH is wanting risotto today and we have a squash to use so a change from fish lol. I only had chicken and mushroom soup yesterday as I was out most of the day.

    #216698

    today it is hotdogs in toastedb uns

    #216736

    Fish and chip Friday 🙂 🙂 🙂

    #216744

    mcdonalds tonight!

    #216747

    Im just cooking a steak and a nice jacket potato tonight , Im still worn out by yesterdays mammoth shopping trip

    #216783

    pigs in blankets

     

    sausages wrapped in bacon, for those who don’t know what that is

     

    very popular around christmas- or in my house, all the time. lol

    #216806

    sausages wrapped in bacon, for those who don’t know what that is

    In the US, pigs in a blanket refers to hot dogs wrapped in some sort of dough, either bread or biscuit.  It can refer to sausages wrapped in pancakes as well.

    Pigs in a Blanket

    For us, Alpine Mac &  Cheese, made with smoked Gouda and Gruyer.  Dad is coming over, and he’s having a hard time swallowing lately.

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  TestDummyCO.
    #216839

    Dad is coming over, and he’s having a hard time swallowing lately.

    That sounds ominous. I do hope he is Ok :/ 🙂

    #216861

    Thanks Jen.  I guess, it’s just part of aging.  He’s always had a few issues, but he’s doing fine otherwise.

    1 member liked this post:
    #216869

    I have an older father, too, TestDummyC. He hasn’t shown any “symptoms” – for lack of a better word – for his ageing. My dad is 68 now. I do worry about the day he can’t go out & about for himself. He is such an independent person. He’d hate living in a care home. In fact, my grandmother is 95 years old and still lives independently. You can tell the type of family I come from!

    Anyhow, I am not trying to worry you TestDummyC. Your dad will surely be with you and your family for a long time to come.

    #216884

    What I meant by, “He’s doing fine otherwise” is “He’s doing fine for now.”  My father is 10 years older than yours, Kitty.  He was diagnosed with Gleason 9 Metastatic Prostate Disease just after Christmas, 2018.   Supposedly, it had metastasized to his bones.  They had given him about 5 years.  Mentally, he’s slowing, but he can still play dominos.  Physically, he’s rapidly declining.  He’s been having trouble walking for a while, but he began falling a lot about two months ago.  He’s now got a walker and is doing better in that respect.

    Unfortunately, the diagnosis sent my already mentally declining mother spiraling deeper into dementia.  She’s been in a facility since September of last year.  While researching facilities and attending dementia support groups, I learned that difficulty swallowing is fairly common.  My mother also had that issue.

    I was going to double that recipe for mac and cheese.  My husband suggested we triple it and give my father a large dish to take home.  When it was time to leave, he said that he didn’t have the room for it in his small refrigerator (he now lives in a 32-foot motor home).

    So, hubby and I will have mac and cheese for the next week.  🙁

    • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  TestDummyCO.
    #216896

    What I meant by, “He’s doing fine otherwise” is “He’s doing fine for now.” My father is 10 years older than yours, Kitty. He was diagnosed with Gleason 9 Metastatic Prostate Disease just after Christmas, 2018. Supposedly, it had metastasized to his bones. They had given him about 5 years. Mentally, he’s slowing, but he can still play dominos. Physically, he’s rapidly declining. He’s been having trouble walking for a while, but he began falling a lot about two months ago. He’s now got a walker and is doing better in that respect.

    Unfortunately, the diagnosis sent my already mentally declining mother spiraling deeper into dementia. She’s been in a facility since September of last year. While researching facilities and attending dementia support groups, I learned that difficulty swallowing is fairly common. My mother also had that issue.

     

    Sorry to hear about your father. Could this be a muscle issue? I know some elderly patients loose muscle memory and tend to choke easily. Sometimes physical therapy and swallowing exercises can help.

    Sadly with dememtia it is a common problem, my MIL ened up on a fluid diet for the last two years of her life due to choking/swallowing issues.

    My husband who is early/mid stage FTD wont eat out anymore because he does occasionally choke (he feels ashamed when it happens)  and earlier this year when he was tested on his first case of pneumonia the doctors said it was most likely caused by him inhaling small food particles.  He has most trouble with dry things like crackers or apple crumble.

    This is one of the reasons that many dementia patients die of pneumonia.

    #216911

    I’m sad to hear about your dad, TestDummyC. I didn’t mean to sound rude in my post. It wasn’t intended to be critical of your own post.

    I think cassandra’s post is correct. You’ve been through heartache, too. Losing my best friend to dementia broke my heart. I’ll never forget him.

    #216915

    I’m having southern fried chicken for dinner, though I’m actually not that hungry today so may leave lots of it haha

    #216961

    Chicken legs with potatoes and veg today.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 91 total)

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