Your First Computer

Female Forum Forums General Discussion General Chat Your First Computer

This topic contains 14 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  SpinningJen 4 weeks ago.

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  • #222661

    I had my first computer in 1999. Back then the Internet wire was a long white one that stretched across the dining room [where the computer sat] floor and was plugged into the router. We always had to unwind and rewind the wire. I LOVED that computer, though. But my dad upgraded and upgraded throughout the years. I wrote my novella “Realm of Dreams” on one of those computers. I put my heart and soul into that story. I also wrote all my essays and short stories for my night-school English class. I loved that class. But – back to the story – I also wrote many, many poems. However, I have only kept a few from that time. Most are forgotten. Still, that computer inspired me to be a writer.

    Do tell me your first computer stories!

    #222668

    1998 a Hewlett Packard multi media with ( if I remember correctly) 333 mb’s… Slow as a steam train with a dial up connection at first we bought it because the children needed it for school.

    I will admit I didnt think much of internet at the time it was so slow to load …

    #222673

    Even though I started taking computer programming classes in 1983, my father didn’t buy one until 1987.  When he replaced that one, he gave it to me.  It was an IBM clone and had 512K memory and dual floppy drives.  I kept it until I bought my first computer in 1996, a Gateway with an Intel Pentium processor and a 2GB hard drive.

    My, have things changed since then!

    #222689

    Computer technology has greatly advanced since 1983, hasn’t it? I was a young child then, so had no access to a computer. It was only in 1999 I gained access to one. I do often feel nostalgia to the old computer programmes and design. I love modern design still but look back with good memories.

    I could not live without my computer today:

    1. I pay all my bills via direct debit
    2. I shop online: this is especially important with the pandemic going on
    3. I order medication online and make medical appointments online
    4. I have my diary on my computer
    5. I have a food diary on my computer
    6. Writing all my short stories and poetry onto my computer
    7. I have email accounts, which help me keep organized
    8. Facebook
    9. Pinterest: which is addictive and completely cool!
    10. Typing out letters and printing them off to friends
    11. Buying gift vouchers online for friends as presents
    12. Having websites I can showcase my poetry
    13. Watching films and music videos on YouTube daily
    14. Being part of Female Forum!

    I need this computer today. It is no longer a luxury but a necessity. I cannot do my work without Internet access, too. I do love the Internet. I have been online for over 25 years. I hope this trend carries on. I live for computing: and always will.

    #222701

    Even though I started taking computer programming classes in 1983, my father didn’t buy one until 1987. When he replaced that one, he gave it to me. It was an IBM clone and had 512K memory and dual floppy drives. I kept it until I bought my first computer in 1996, a Gateway with an Intel Pentium processor and a 2GB hard drive.

    My, have things changed since then!

    I had similar – An Amstrad 1512 IBM clone with 512 K of memory an twin floppy drives when I did my Open University course. That was the machine I learnt much of my programming on. In those days, at work, a PC would be the centerpiece of any office and almost be worshipped (or cursed) 😀

    #222709

    My dad bought a Commodore 64, so that was my first exposure, when I was a young one. I think I had a chunky used IBM laptop by college, but it wasn’t any more useful than my typewriter (which I miss). Shared computers otherwise, including desktops with Linux. Then I got a laptop all to myself in 2006. By then, the Internet was my social hangout spot. Now it’s like the library, the department store, and social hangout spot. Plus church is online right now, so it’s a church building, too. 😉

    #222713

    I had similar – An Amstrad 1512 IBM clone with 512 K of memory an twin floppy drives when I did my Open University course.

    That’s exactly what my dad gave me!  Thanks for reminding me of the name, Jen.

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    #223080

    I LOVE retro computers: they’re so cool. I do wonder where you buy them from? And how much would one cost to set up and run? I write this because a lot of people are getting back into old-skool computers. Especially when they’re programmed with modern programmes. Computer companies are cottoning onto this.

    I am glad I started this thread!

    #223140

    I would think running modern programs on old computers would be very limited without changing the insides of the computer Kitty. Maybe they do that, so you get a new computer in an old case? It would be feasible to network an old computer, as a dumb terminal, to a modern system, which could be interesting (maybe not straightforward though?). The main thing I have seen is people wanting old game consoles to play retro games but these games can be obtained to play in special software on a modern PC, which is how many people do. Old computers are being continually scrapped as they fetch no money. It is only some of the first ones which are now really collectible, as far as I know.

    1 member liked this post:
    #223165

    I must’ve been wrong with my post content. Your post pointed out a few facts to me, SpinningJen.

    I do know – personally speaking – I’d love a retro computer. It may not be feasible, though, as you’ve pointed out. They are nostalgic and I would love one. But, alas, it won’t happen. Still, I am glad I posted what I did, because now I am not in the dark. So thank you, SpinningJen.

    1 member liked this post:
    #223189

    I think the thing about computers is not so much what they are but what software they can run Kitty. The thing to do when looking for a new system is to list what you want to do with it rather than look what it might do. That way you one is not lost in a maze of possibilities which only confuse and perhaps mainly never followed. It’s like getting a new car with all the bells and whistles but never using them, only wishing one to get from A to B.

    In that way almost any retro system could be used by yourself to write your books and poetry as the basic wordprocessing software has been around from early days. The thing to look at would be how you transfer your work to your modern system for online publishing etc. Keeping the old computer offline would very much limit the possibility of virus infection. This would be sensible as the old software system would not be updated (or possibly even be able to be) for virus protection although, it should be said, it may well not be as susceptable as virus writers would not be targetting it.

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    #226118

    my first computer came with a dvd copy of the  movie space jam. it was very basic, and had a couple card games installed- and a few puzzle games too (one I remember was actually one where you had to spend most of the game figuring out what the secret code is).

     

    I don’t think I had internet until much later, when I finally did it was this slow dial-up one, and I got to spend like 30/40 minits on it a night, and had to diss connect if the phone rang. back then, their wasn’t really much to do online so I’d spend most of my time brouzing the home page of my internet provider viewing the news and the other weekly updated content. my internet breakthrough when my school set me some homework to do on the author roald dahl. it was then I found the first website that was more catered to my age

    #226121

    I also remember being an active member of the cbbc newsround forum. back then, forums only opened for a few hours at night (I think this one was like 4 until 8). I don’t remember any of my posts (I think one of them might have been a poem of some sort), but what I do remember is begging the administrators to keep me on their board even after I’d gone past the age limit

     

    it worked, too!. I was a part of the forum for a little longer than most kids

     

    ah those were the days..

    #226122

    I love this thread.

     

    love talking nestalja

    #227101

    I remember the slow dial up connections. After a while it was possible to get free dial up connections so, even though it was slow, at least the connection time cost nothing. It was a case of going on during off peak times though as there was high demand.

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